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A Self-Care Guide for Women During the COVID-19 Quarantine

The times we are currently living in have been incredibly unsettling and uncertain for many of us. We are encouraged to stay at home and change the way we live without much time for acclimation. There has been a shift in the way we work; some are working from home, some are not working at all, and some are now managing a home, caring for small children and helping children with online school.

We have had to change the way we shop, celebrate, and find new ways to enjoy our hobbies. We have had to distance ourselves from the people we love. Change can be hard. Change can be stressful. A nationwide quarantine can bring forth depression, PTSD, anger, and frustration.  

We want to recognize that change can be difficult at times. It’s common and totally normal to feel afraid and stressed during a pandemic. But taking time to step away from the noise and focus on yourself and really acknowledge the ones around you can help ease those feelings.

How can we make the most of this change and embrace the good that comes out of quarantine?

Here are eight ideas that we’ve gathered:

  1. Self-Care-Moreland-OBGYNSearch for five things that currently bring you joy. Not what brought you joy six months ago but what makes you happy now. Write them down. Pick one thing from this list each day and make sure it happens. Is one thing having more time to cook? Whip up a delicious meal. Is one having more time to soak in a tub full of bubbles? Draw that bath.
  2. Put away the phone or tablet and take a break from social scrolling and TV watching and make time for downtime. Find activities that make you laugh, smile or force a conversation with another human being. Reconnect with an old friend on the phone or make your kids laugh when playing a game. Tell a story and listen to each other’s voices. Enjoy the human voice.
  3. Give your partner, your children, and others living with you some space. We are spending much more time together and for some, the closeness may feel suffocating. Find activities you can spend time doing alone and encourage others in your home to do the same.
  4. Reconnect with nature. Feel the warmth of the sun on your face. Listen to the birds, watch their movements, and observe the business of their day. Take in the smell of freshly cut grass and see if that sparks a positive memory.
  5. Think about things you did as a child that brought you happiness. You may have forgotten how much fun participating in these activities can be. Ride a bike, paint or color, play an instrument, write down a story or poem, or close your eyes and simply daydream.
  6. Make time to move every day, whether it is getting back into a regular exercise program, practice deep breathing, or walking outside.
  7. Start a journal and write down your current feelings. Putting them on paper gives allows you to own your current feeling, acknowledge them and then let them free. Recording your thoughts on paper can keep your thoughts organized and can strengthen self-discipline.
  8. More than ever, self-care should be at the forefront of your mind. Bathe or shower regularly. Put on a new outfit every day to symbolize the restart of a new day. Brush your teeth and hair. Enjoy preparing and eating healthy foods and take time to enjoy the food’s flavors. Research some healthy or new recipes and enjoy the outcome of a good meal.

Remind yourself of the reason for quarantine daily. This reminder keeps us safe and more importantly others are safer, who may be more vulnerable to illness. It also reminds us not to fall idle in our practice to frequent hand-washing, daily disinfecting of commonly touched surfaces, and to avoid face touching. A daily reminder also reminds us there is hope! As days pass it gets us closer to the end, which will eventually come.

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Practice Self-Care

If you feel anxious or unsafe please call your primary physician or call the Waukesha County Mental Health Hotline Information and Referral. The mental health intake worker is available during regular business hours, Monday-Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., to answer questions and to help you find the right services to meet your needs. Call (262) 548-7666.

Crisis Intervention

During regular business hours, contact the outpatient clinic at (262) 548-7666 and ask to speak with a crisis worker. During non-business hours, contact Impact 2-1-1 via the Waukesha County hotline at (262) 547-3388 and ask to speak with a Waukesha County mental health crisis worker.

Support is out there for you! Reach out to our team of professionals at Moreland for guidance and assistance in your self-care quarantine journey. At Moreland OB-GYN, our mission is to lead women to better health. Reach out today!

 

Here are some additional resources from our team!

 

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